Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mike Pernick

BREMERTON, Wash. -USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) got underway from Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton to conduct routine training for future operations, Nov. 3.

Following a highly successful planned incremental availability and subsequent flight deck certification, John C. Stennis is looking ahead toward future real-world operations. To prepare the ship and its crew for future deployments, it will conduct a variety of training and certification evolutions both at sea and in port throughout its training cycle.

During the underway, John C. Stennis Sailors will conduct damage control and firefighting training, seamanship training, small boat operations, medical training, and exercises designed to maintain technical and tactical proficiency in a variety of warfare areas.

John C. Stennis is underway conducting training as it continues preparing for its next scheduled deployment.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

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Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class William Ford

BREMERTON, Wash. – Sailors stationed aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) completed the graded phase of their Anti-terrorism Force Protection (ATFP) Assessment and Readiness Certification, Oct. 23-27.

John C. Stennis Sailors completed a litany of drills during the assessment, to include ID penetration drills at both the entry control point and aboard the ship, bomb threats, suspicious packages, and small boat and swimmer attacks, passing with a score of 96 percent.

The ATFP assessment, conducted by Commander, Naval Air Forces, U.S. Pacific Fleet and Afloat Training Group (ATG), determines the readiness of a command’s watchstanders.

“The purpose of the assessment is to train, inspect and certify the command’s ability to protect and defend our ship, crew and assets anywhere in the world,” said Master-at-Arms 1st Class Matthew Harrington, leading petty officer of the security department aboard John C. Stennis, from Delray Beach, Florida. “We were glad to see our Sailors overcome the adversity we put them in and use their training to defend against the simulated threats. We constantly train our Sailors so when the time comes, their training will kick in and overcome the enemy.”

ATG worked with John C. Stennis Sailors in the weeks leading up to the assessment to improve any deficiencies, provide feedback and prepare them for the final phase.
“Our goal was to make your watchstanders proficient in all anti-terrorism aspects, whether it be an active shooter, improvised explosive devices or any other threats to the ship,” said Gunner’s Mate 1st Class Stephen Lyons from Dover, Delaware, an ATG member. “I expect them to take everything we’ve taught them and just run with it and react to any threat without hesitation.”

As John C. Stennis continues to train and prepare for future operations, it is imperative the ship’s security forces remain ready for all types of threats.

“The world has changed, and so have the type of threats we may encounter,” said Lt. Reico Taylor, the security officer aboard John C. Stennis, from Douglas, Georgia. “We must be prepared to deter terrorism while protecting John C. Stennis and its crew against a wide-range of threats at any given moment.”

John C. Stennis is in port training for future operations after completing flight deck certification and conducting carrier qualifications.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Ikenna Tanaka

BREMERTON, Wash. – Sailors assigned to USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) donated blood during a blood drive aboard the ship, Oct. 24.
Lt. Devon Graham, a supply officer assigned to John C. Stennis, from Yuma, Arizona, coordinated the blood drive with the Armed Services Blood Bank Center Pacific Northwest mobile team from Madigan Army Medical Center at Joint Base Lewis-McChord.

“I was inspired with this idea right after the [Las] Vegas shooting, and I felt that everyone needed some good,” said Graham. “I wanted a way where it was easy and convenient for everyone on board to help and reach out to other people.”
John C. Stennis Sailors donated 59 pints of blood during the four-hour blood drive.
Blood received by the Armed Services Blood Bank goes to service members, active or retired, around the world.
“It’s good to know that I’m able to help out a fellow service member,” said Fire Controlman 2nd Class Jacob Class, from Cape Girardeau, Missouri, who was one of the blood donors. “It reminds us that we’re all in this together.”

John C. Stennis is in port training for future operations after conducting flight deck certification and carrier qualifications.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Ikenna Tanaka

BREMERTON, Wash. – USS John C. Stennis’ (CVN 74) Health Promotions Committee hosted a Breast Cancer Awareness Month event in the ship’s hangar bay, Oct. 31.

The event was held to raise awareness of breast cancer and encourage attendees to participate in regular health check-ups.

“This year, there will be more than 3.1 million women with a history of breast cancer in this country,” said Lt. Blaze Chatham, John C. Stennis’ physical therapist, from Newburgh, New York. “It’s good to have an awareness event that shows the ship is supporting and thinking about the many that are affected by this disease.”

To help build awareness and commemorate Breast Cancer Awareness Month, more than 40 Sailors gathered and performed 31 burpees each that represented each day in October. Burpees are a full-body functional exercise that combines a push-up and quick recovery into the standing position.

Hospitalman Felix Mendoza, from San Benito, Texas, participated in the exercise challenge in honor of a family member that he lost to breast cancer.

“This challenge serves a great purpose in spreading the awareness of breast cancer,” said Mendoza. “I’ve become devoted to living a healthier lifestyle, exercising regularly and try to beat off any diseases that come my way. So, I want to try to spread that awareness by getting involved with Breast Cancer Awareness Month.”

The Health Promotions Committee handed out information graphics, brochures and fact sheets to further educate attendees on breast cancer and women’s health.

John C. Stennis is in port training for future operations after completing flight deck certification and conducting carrier qualifications.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mike Pernick

BREMERTON, Wash. -The USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) AIRSpeed team is part of a Navy-wide program committed to continuously improving performance across all aviation domains.
Their mission is to advance and sustain naval aviation war-fighting capabilities at an affordable cost today and in the future. AIRSpeed also provides the strategy, structure, skills and project management to align, implement and sustain continuous process improvement to provide the war fighter with the right readiness at the right time at the best possible cost.
“We are currently working on a rapid improvement event for Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Department’s (AIMD/IM4) ground support equipment in an attempt to reduce man hours lost on moving equipment so maintenance can be performed,” said Lt. Clint Newman, quality assurance officer, from Anniston, Alabama. ” This is one of four major ship-wide projects that will be showcased during the upcoming ‘Boots on Deck’ event scheduled for early next spring.”
NAVAIR (Naval Air Systems Command) 6.0, Assistant Commander, Logistics and Industrial Operations coordinates the “Boots on Deck” program for commands afloat and ashore enabling leadership to interact directly with a command and observe firsthand their challenges and successes.
Newman also said it’s not an inspection, but a fact gathering event intended to benefit the host commands.
Other projects the John C. Stennis AIRSpeed team are working on include improved methods to eliminate waste, disseminate mass quantities of supply products and installing a 3D printer for the engineering department.

“We take a combination of multiple philosophies and we use specific tools to assist other people in making their processes more efficient,” said Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class, Joshua Walters, AIRSpeed team member, from Winnsboro, Louisiana. “We also aim to eliminate processes that are wasteful, help reduce the number of defects from people’s methods and help alleviate any constraints by saving time, energy, manpower and costs.”

Another beneficial aspect of the program is that any Sailor may submit a request or suggest an idea for the AIRSpeed team to look into regardless of rank or rate.

John C. Stennis is in port training for future operations after conducting flight deck certification and carrier qualifications.
For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Susan C. Damman

BREMERTON, Wash. – Sailors aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) celebrated Hispanic Heritage Month in the ship’s hangar bay, Oct. 4.

The celebration, hosted by John C. Stennis’ Multi-Cultural Heritage Committee (MCHC), featured guest speakers from the ship’s crew, music, dancing and food.

“Let us not be ashamed of who we are or where we come from, but let’s celebrate today that we’re Americans with a lot to offer to the world,” said Lt. j.g. Gabriel Sanchez, from Ruskin, Fla., one of the speakers at the event. “As we observe Hispanic Heritage Month, please know that we are all created equal and it is truly an honor and a pleasure to serve alongside you all.”

Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Cecibel Montesdeoca, from Newark, New Jersey, shared information about her home country of Ecuador, and Personnel Specialist 3rd Class Luz Pradaholguin, from Cali, Colombia, spoke about Colombia. They discussed the geographic and biological diversity and described the meaning of the countries’ flags.

Seventeen percent of enlisted Sailors and eight percent of Naval officers identify as Hispanic, according to Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairs.

“Sailors should appreciate one another and understand that the Navy is made up of all these different cultures, ethnicities and backgrounds,” said Yeoman 3rd Class Jazmin Maria, from Robbins, N.C., MCHC president. “We’re a big melting pot.”

Sailors demonstrated Merengue and Bachata dancing and invited the crowd to join in. The MCHC provided snacks including pan dulce and Mexican candies coated in chili powder.

Hispanic Heritage Month runs Sept. 15 – Oct. 15, which includes the Independence Day anniversaries for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Mexico, and Chile.

John C. Stennis is in port training for future operations after completing flight deck certification and conducting carrier qualifications.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

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Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cole C. Pielop

BREMERTON, Wash. – USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) returned to its homeport of Bremerton, Wash., after a successful three-week underway, Sept. 22.
During the underway, the longest since completing a Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard five days ahead of schedule, the crew accomplished important milestones in their return to operations by conducting training, testing systems and equipment, and completing a critical certification.

“The crew performed above all expectations,” said Capt. Greg Huffman, commanding officer of John C. Stennis. “From our engineers keeping our systems running to the vital flight deck certification demonstrating our readiness to carry out the core mission of an aircraft carrier, I saw a professional crew executing their mission. The crew’s performance was extraordinary, particularly after a long period where we focused their expertise on maintenance.”

Representatives from Commander, Naval Air Forces, Pacific observed flight operations to evaluate how well the ship was able to launch, recover and taxi aircraft to complete flight deck certification. Once the deck was certified, naval aviators from Carrier Air Wing Nine and Strike Fighter Squadron 122 practiced launching and recovering on a moving flight deck, during both the day and at night, for carrier qualifications.

“This underway was an important step towards becoming operational following the maintenance period and doing what we do best, launching and recovering warplanes to fight the fight,” Huffman explained.

Sailors also carried out damage control training with general quarters drills, conducted replenishments-at-sea, tested ship defense equipment and took time to honor deceased Sailors during a burial-at-sea.

For many Sailors, this was their first significant period at sea.

“I’ve been in for almost eight years and this is my first sea command,” said Master-at-Arms 1st Class Cody Crane, from Cave Creek, Ariz. “I got here just after the Hawaii underway and everything was torn down and covered up. Now that we’re in the open ocean it feels like we are really doing our job. All of the things we have been training for we are finally putting to use.”

Twenty John C. Stennis Sailors will never forget the day they were promoted to chief petty officer during a ceremony in the ship’s hangar bay while underway in the Pacific Ocean, Sept. 15.

“[During the ceremony] we thought about our families,” said Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Eric Atkinson, from Pittsburgh. “I would have loved to have my wife pin me and have my two daughters put on my anchors but I wouldn’t change it for the world.”

Huffman expressed his thanks for the crew’s hard work during the underway.
“Our focus will be on maintaining the momentum we’ve built up this underway,” said Huffman. “We’re looking ahead toward the rest of our work up cycle, getting our ship ready to take our turn back out in the fight and keeping that operational mindset.”

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cole C. Pielop

BREMERTON, Wash. – USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) returned to its homeport of Bremerton, Wash., after a successful three-week underway, Sept. 22.
During the underway, the longest since completing a Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard five days ahead of schedule, the crew accomplished important milestones in their return to operations by conducting training, testing systems and equipment, and completing a critical certification.

“The crew performed above all expectations,” said Capt. Greg Huffman, commanding officer of John C. Stennis. “From our engineers keeping our systems running to the vital flight deck certification demonstrating our readiness to carry out the core mission of an aircraft carrier, I saw a professional crew executing their mission. The crew’s performance was extraordinary, particularly after a long period where we focused their expertise on maintenance.”

Representatives from Commander, Naval Air Forces, Pacific observed flight operations to evaluate how well the ship was able to launch, recover and taxi aircraft to complete flight deck certification. Once the deck was certified, naval aviators from Carrier Air Wing Nine and Strike Fighter Squadron 122 practiced launching and recovering on a moving flight deck, during both the day and at night, for carrier qualifications.

“This underway was an important step towards becoming operational following the maintenance period and doing what we do best, launching and recovering warplanes to fight the fight,” Huffman explained.

Sailors also carried out damage control training with general quarters drills, conducted replenishments-at-sea, tested ship defense equipment and took time to honor deceased Sailors during a burial-at-sea.

For many Sailors, this was their first significant period at sea.

“I’ve been in for almost eight years and this is my first sea command,” said Master-at-Arms 1st Class Cody Crane, from Cave Creek, Ariz. “I got here just after the Hawaii underway and everything was torn down and covered up. Now that we’re in the open ocean it feels like we are really doing our job. All of the things we have been training for we are finally putting to use.”

Twenty John C. Stennis Sailors will never forget the day they were promoted to chief petty officer during a ceremony in the ship’s hangar bay while underway in the Pacific Ocean, Sept. 15.

“[During the ceremony] we thought about our families,” said Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Eric Atkinson, from Pittsburgh. “I would have loved to have my wife pin me and have my two daughters put on my anchors but I wouldn’t change it for the world.”

Huffman expressed his thanks for the crew’s hard work during the underway.
“Our focus will be on maintaining the momentum we’ve built up this underway,” said Huffman. “We’re looking ahead toward the rest of our work up cycle, getting our ship ready to take our turn back out in the fight and keeping that operational mindset.”

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Susan C. Damman

PACIFIC OCEAN – Sailors gathered in USS John C. Stennis’ (CVN 74) hangar bay for a “Tackle the DUI” tailgating event, Sept. 17.

The event promoted healthier lifestyles and raised awareness of the effects of alcohol with informational booths and football themed activities. By arming their peers with information, John C. Stennis Sailors hoped to prevent their shipmates from driving under the influence (DUI).

The tailgate was organized by the ship’s Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) working with the command Drug and Alcohol Program Advisors (DAPA), First Class Petty Officers Association (FCPOA), Second Class Petty Officers Association (SCPOA) and Junior Enlisted Association (JEA).

The event began on a serious note. Several Sailors told personal stories about alcohol, and what the consequences of driving under the influence have been for them both professionally and personally.

“I think if I could help anybody with my experience, if I could reach out and positively influence somebody, then that would be awesome,” said Chief Fire Controlman Mick Kirby, from Cottage Grove, Ore., one of the guest speakers. “Something I would love people to understand is that when you are dealing with addiction, it’s impossible to beat it without help, and the Navy has great resources to help.”

CSADD set up trivia booths with facts, statistics and common misconceptions about alcohol use.

“We definitely had a few dropped jaws,” said Electronics Technician 3rd Class Annalyss Blanco, from Apopka, Fla., who set up the booths for CSADD. “People were surprised by some of the statistics.”

Blanco said Sailors seemed staggered to learn that each day 28 people in America die as a result of drunk driving crashes, and one in three people will be involved in a drunk driving crash in their lifetime. Blanco also said few of the Sailors she talked to were aware that carbonation increases the speed of alcohol absorption.

As the event continued, it began to more closely resemble a tailgate party with football games playing on a large inflatable screen, and snacks and cotton candy provided by the SCPOA.

JEA provided goggles that simulate how drinking alcohol can distort your senses. Sailors tried to throw a football through a goal post while wearing the goggles.

“If you can’t throw a football into a post with drunk goggles on, how are you going to drive a car,” said Yeoman 3rd Class Regan Edwards, from Ocean City, Md., and JEA president. “Hopefully people take this seriously and the awareness goes up. I hope people realize that the consequences of drinking and driving are more than losing rank or losing money. It hurts more than yourself.”

At the FCPOA booth, Sailors were invited to sign a banner pledging to never drink and drive.

“I don’t want to promote people not to drink; I want to promote responsible drinking,” said Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Robert Hodor, the command DAPA. “I know people are going to drink, just be reasonable about it.”

Hodor also said if any Sailor is having a problem with alcohol they should talk to one of the DAPAs. They are there to help.

John C. Stennis underway training for future operations after conducting carrier qualifications and completing flight deck certification.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cole C. Pielop

PACIFIC OCEAN – Twenty Sailors were promoted to chief petty officer (CPO) during a frocking ceremony aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), Sept. 15.

At the ceremony, members of the Chiefs Mess pinned gold, fouled anchors, the insignia of CPOs, on the new chiefs’ uniform collars and placed chief combination covers on their heads.

“[Being pinned] was a culmination of everything coming together,” said Chief Information Systems Technician Tyreeh Bailey, from Colorado Springs, Colorado. “As an E-3 I didn’t think this day would come, but E-3 me would be proud that I’ve got to where I am and I can hold my head high and say I’ve accomplished this.”

Master Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Tyrone Johnson spoke to the selectees about the responsibilities that come along with the new rank.
“The anchors on this ship weight 60,000 pounds,” said Johnson. “I assure you there will be days in which the ones you are about to wear will feel like they weigh just as much. There is good news; you’re not alone. Seniors and juniors will help you. Most importantly every chief on this planet, retired, or active will be there for you. Thank you for stepping up as our reliefs.”
Upon hearing the chief advancement results in August, selectees began a training program called CPO 365 phase two to transition into CPOs.
“The biggest part for me was the things we had to accomplish together as a team,” said Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Eric Atkinson, from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. “There’s no more individual involved. Sometimes some of us tend to go off and do things on our own and think we can accomplish things but you really can’t. You need that teamwork and brotherhood that we learned.”

The names of the new chiefs are Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) Dennis Archer; Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Eric Atkinson; Chief Information Systems Technician Tyreeh Bailey; Chief Aviation Electronics Technician Gregory Barry; Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Fuel) Tyrone Binongcal; Chief Hospital Corpsman Bryan Clarke; Chief Aviation Electronics Technician Andrew Folsom; Chief Aviation Support Equipment Technician Mark Garin; Chief Fire Controlman Michael Kirby; Chief Aviation Structural Mechanic Jason Knopes; Chief Air Traffic Controller Joshua Koble; Chief Logistics Specialist Jian Lin; Chief Electrician’s Mate Michele Mcpherson; Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) Harry Meyer III; Chief Machinist’s Mate Max Reiter; Chief Machinist’s Mate Alex Fenton, Chief Aviation Support Equipment Technician Joephaz Sanchez; Chief Machinist’s Mate Davis Webb; Chief Mass Communication Specialist Matthew White and Chief Damage Controlman Matthew Wierson.

John C. Stennis is underway conducting carrier qualifications and training for future operations after completing flight deck certification.

For more news from USS John C. Stennis visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

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