Story by Mass Communication 3rd Class Grant G. Grady

BREMERTON, Wash. – “Ding-ding, ding-ding,” sounds the bell on the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74). Sailors scurry to their respective spaces with hot coffee in hands. “Set Material Condition Hour (MCH),” bellows the Petty Officer of the Watch. John C. Stennis Sailors start the work day by digging out their foxtails and dust pans, but do they know the plan to conduct MCH?

MCH is more than just a quick sweep and swab of the deck. A set of clear day-to-day guidelines exist in Executive Officer (XO) Gram 9-17 Material Condition Hour.

For example, Monday focuses on those hard to reach areas and cleaning the decks with warm soapy water. Thursdays Sailors clean vents, filters, doors and hatches. The XO gram sets these daily guidelines to make sure John C. Stennis Sailors don’t miss any spots in their spaces.

Furthermore, the XO gram states how Sailors should conduct traffic during MCH.
The starboard passageways secure on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The portside passageways secure on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. This allows Sailors to deep clean their spaces without having traffic slowing the process.

However, major projects on highly transited areas like the 03 level and 2nd deck passageways have a different set of guidelines.

Major stripping, waxing or buffing on those levels takes place after taps or 30 minutes after flight operations until 0500 the next day.

The XO Gram exists to guide John C. Stennis on how to keep a high standard of material condition. It helps John C. Stennis Sailors conduct MCH in an orderly and effective manner.

Navy ships across the fleet participate in MCH to keep their ships clean and safe. MCH not only keeps the ship looking good, but contributes to damage control safety by eliminating hazards ranging from fire to electrical.

For more information, view XO Gram 9-17 Material Condition Hour in the command directives on the John C. Stennis homepage.
For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74, Twitter @stennis74, or Instagram @stennisCVN74.

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Story by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Joshua Leonard

PACIFIC OCEAN – For midshipmen, experience in the fleet is an invaluable asset. It can help them determine which path they want to follow as their naval careers progress, and it helps them better understand the world they will be serving in when they graduate from the Navy Recruit Officer Training Command (NROTC) program.

Seventeen midshipmen from universities ranging from the University of Southern California to Virginia Tech joined the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), June 14, for their summer cruise.

The midshipmen summer cruise is similar to a summer internship, or a work-study program. While NROTC programs provide relevant military training, there is no substitution for fleet experience.

“This allows them to get out to sea, and be with Sailors in the fleet, both enlisted and officers.” said Lt. Michael Woodward, a flight officer assigned to John C. Stennis and midshipmen training officer for the NROTC cruise. “The other thing it does is allow Midshipmen from different NROTC programs to have a uniform experience.”

The Sailors aboard John C. Stennis had the opportunity to impact the Midshipman’s experience at sea.

“The biggest take away from my cruise is just the attitude,” said Dugan McAdams, a Midshipman 2nd Class from Ohio State University. “The team aspect is so strong, everyone is willing to help each other.”
With almost every type of naval officer assigned to the crew, John C. Stennis offers a unique learning environment for the midshipmen.

“My cruise last year was structured in a different way,” said McAdams. “We had specific times where we were going to meet with officers in different department. Here it’s a much more open experience. Earlier today I ran into a few traditional surface warfare officers (SWO) on the bridge and talked to them about the SWO community.”

McAdams said that being aboard John C. Stennis and exploring the different departments has made him look at officer programs differently. The nuclear program was something he wasn’t considering previously, but after watching how the program operates, McAdams said, it now seems like a more desirable career path. However, he is still currently pursuing a career in aviation.

Regardless of which NROTC program the midshipmen are from, being on John C. Stennis has given them the opportunity to learn how the fleet operates and experience a hands-on look at each of the Navy’s different career paths.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class William Rosencrans

PACIFIC OCEAN – A splash of color on canvas and the murmur of Sailor-artists filled the aft mess decks as Sailors enjoyed nachos and refreshments during the first paint and dip event held by the Second Class Petty Officer Association (SCPOA), aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis, June 22.

Event coordinator, Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Cymone Surrell-Morris, explained the event as “an opportunity for Sailors to release creative energy and de-stress.”

SCPOA provided everything the aspiring artists needed to start a work of art, including paint, brushes, canvases, instruction and even nachos to fill the creative appetite. Sailors from various rates and ranks attended the festivities.

“I just enjoyed how simple and relaxing the event was,” said Yeoman Seaman Manuel Gandia. “With how stressful life can be on a ship, this event provided a calm setting that allowed me a moment to unwind.”

Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Garvin Williams, president of the SCPOA, modeled the event after a similar paint and sip experience. Williams felt it was important to imitate the atmosphere of those events as best as possible to provide an immersive and stress-relieving experience. “Our goal is to boost morale [of the crew] and let everyone relax and enjoy refreshments,” said Williams.

Turn out for the event was much larger than expected and prompted Williams to consider more events of this type in the future. “We will definitely have more during Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMTUEX) and of course deployment,” said Williams.

In keeping with the mission of SCPOA to support command events to increase morale and community outreach projects, Sailors aboard John C. Stennis can look forward to future painting and crafting events in the upcoming underway periods.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Joshua L. Leonard

PACIFIC OCEAN – Sailors aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) met with members of various organizations during a health fair hosted by the health promotions committee in the hangar bay, June 24.

Sailors visited booths with topics ranging from physical fitness to dental health. Each booth gave Sailors advice and education on how to stay healthy on shore and at sea.

“The health fair is here to raise awareness on a variety of different health topics,” said Lt. Blaze Chatham, a medical service corps officer and health promotions coordinator. “We’re talking about everything from dental health to injury prevention. We’re focusing on common issues that Sailors have that can effect their health and their life.”

Another area of focus was physical fitness, which Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Airman Grace Howard felt was one of the more beneficial parts of the event.

“One of the biggest takeaways I had was the physical fitness presentation,” said Howard. “They showed us the proper way to lift weights. I also really enjoyed the stress management portion of the night as well.”

In addition to educating shipmates on their health, Sailors appreciated feedback about how to make the ship a healthier environment.
“I decided to make a survey of healthy food options that could be brought into the ship’s store,” said Ensign Paul Fogolin, a supply officer aboard John C. Stennis. “The main goal is to find out what healthy options Sailors want, so we can bring it in and make it available to them.”
The health fair also encouraged Sailors to ask right away if they had health questions.

“The ship has a lot of resources where they can get health information outside of events like this,” said Chatham. “This is the first health fair since I’ve been here. We generally put on one or two events a month, in addition to all the services on board, such as chaplains and psychologists for stress issues and tobacco cessation programs for Sailors looking to quit tobacco use.”

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Joshua L. Leonard

PACIFIC OCEAN – Sailors aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) met with members of various organizations during a health fair hosted by the health promotions committee in the hangar bay, June 24.

Sailors visited booths with topics ranging from physical fitness to dental health. Each booth gave Sailors advice and education on how to stay healthy on shore and at sea.

“The health fair is here to raise awareness on a variety of different health topics,” said Lt. Blaze Chatham, a medical service corps officer and health promotions coordinator. “We’re talking about everything from dental health to injury prevention. We’re focusing on common issues that Sailors have that can effect their health and their life.”

Another area of focus was physical fitness, which Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Airman Grace Howard felt was one of the more beneficial parts of the event.

“One of the biggest takeaways I had was the physical fitness presentation,” said Howard. “They showed us the proper way to lift weights. I also really enjoyed the stress management portion of the night as well.”

In addition to educating shipmates on their health, Sailors appreciated feedback about how to make the ship a healthier environment.
“I decided to make a survey of healthy food options that could be brought into the ship’s store,” said Ensign Paul Fogolin, a supply officer aboard John C. Stennis. “The main goal is to find out what healthy options Sailors want, so we can bring it in and make it available to them.”
The health fair also encouraged Sailors to ask right away if they had health questions.

“The ship has a lot of resources where they can get health information outside of events like this,” said Chatham. “This is the first health fair since I’ve been here. We generally put on one or two events a month, in addition to all the services on board, such as chaplains and psychologists for stress issues and tobacco cessation programs for Sailors looking to quit tobacco use.”

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Joshua L. Leonard

PACIFIC OCEAN – Sailors aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) met with members of various organizations during a health fair hosted by the health promotions committee in the hangar bay, June 24.

Sailors visited booths with topics ranging from physical fitness to dental health. Each booth gave Sailors advice and education on how to stay healthy on shore and at sea.

“The health fair is here to raise awareness on a variety of different health topics,” said Lt. Blaze Chatham, a medical service corps officer and health promotions coordinator. “We’re talking about everything from dental health to injury prevention. We’re focusing on common issues that Sailors have that can effect their health and their life.”

Another area of focus was physical fitness, which Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Airman Grace Howard felt was one of the more beneficial parts of the event.

“One of the biggest takeaways I had was the physical fitness presentation,” said Howard. “They showed us the proper way to lift weights. I also really enjoyed the stress management portion of the night as well.”

In addition to educating shipmates on their health, Sailors appreciated feedback about how to make the ship a healthier environment.
“I decided to make a survey of healthy food options that could be brought into the ship’s store,” said Ensign Paul Fogolin, a supply officer aboard John C. Stennis. “The main goal is to find out what healthy options Sailors want, so we can bring it in and make it available to them.”
The health fair also encouraged Sailors to ask right away if they had health questions.

“The ship has a lot of resources where they can get health information outside of events like this,” said Chatham. “This is the first health fair since I’ve been here. We generally put on one or two events a month, in addition to all the services on board, such as chaplains and psychologists for stress issues and tobacco cessation programs for Sailors looking to quit tobacco use.”

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cole C. Pielop

RENTON, Wash. – It’s nothing new for a Sailor to have a sea bag full of uniforms, but for Lt. j.g. Keenan Reynolds, his bag is a little heavier. There is one extra uniform, that of a Seattle Seahawk.
Reynolds, a reserve cryptologic warfare officer and 2016 U.S. Naval Academy graduate, broke multiple records during his four years at the academy, including a 32 – 13 record, the most wins in school history by a quarterback. The naval academy retired Reynolds’ number, 19, making him the fourth person in school history to have this honor.
Reynolds stellar collegiate performance caught the eye of many NFL teams. Former Secretary of Defense Ash Carter granted Reynolds the rare opportunity to further his football career by allowing him to serve his obligated time as a reserve officer and complete his drill time in the off season.
“It’s a blessing to have the opportunity to be able to do both,” said Reynolds. “Playing football has always been a childhood dream and I’ve had a football in my hands as long as I can remember. I remember growing up and watching some of these guys play. So to be out here with them is surreal. It’s an interesting combination being on both sides of the coin.
“You’d be surprised, a lot of people here [in the NFL] want to know what we do on the military side and want to know about the academy and the process of how I serve,” he said. “On the flip side, when I drill, people want to know about the NFL, what life is like, what this player is like. It’s cool to have perspective from both of them and introduce people into new ways of thinking.”
Reynolds mentioned that making the switch from quarterback to receiver was tough after playing quarterback his whole life, but having many people invested in him at the academy has helped him immensely.
“Having mentors you can draw on and being an empty cup allows you to gain that knowledge and grow your leadership,” said Reynolds. “When you have graduated and are in the fleet, you have these four years of experiences from the academy to draw back on to be a good leader. I think that ties directly into football. I try to learn as much as I can off the field so that when I’m on the field … I can draw back on what I’ve learned and allow it to help me be more successful.”
Reynolds says he remembers his first year at the academy and that no privileges are guaranteed, very much like rookie season.
“[At the academy] you have to earn everything and respect your elders,” said Reynolds. “It’s kind of the same thing as a rookie. You’re coming into a place where people have been playing for years and have tremendous experience. You have to respect that and be willing to be a follower. There’s a bunch of little tricks of the trade that people don’t know about and you don’t know in college. When you get [to the NFL] you have to be humble enough to serve. So I think that humility instilled in me early on at the academy from really helped me my rookie year.”
Reynolds was selected to play in the 2016 East-West Shrine games but was unable to play due to back pain. Even though he never stepped foot on the field he was awarded the Pat Tillman award, presented to a player who shows the best character, sportsmanship and service both on and off the field.
“[The NFL] is a little different than expected; it’s a learning process and having the experience from the academy was a learning process as well,” said Reynolds. “I think being at the academy has helped me navigate through the NFL. It isn’t easy. The academy isn’t easy. There’s going to be some ups and downs. The whole point of it is being able to push through and have perseverance and being able to find the light at the end of the tunnel.”
For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cole C. Pielop

RENTON, Wash. – It’s nothing new for a Sailor to have a sea bag full of uniforms, but for Lt. j.g. Keenan Reynolds, his bag is a little heavier. There is one extra uniform, that of a Seattle Seahawk.
Reynolds, a reserve cryptologic warfare officer and 2016 U.S. Naval Academy graduate, broke multiple records during his four years at the academy, including a 32 – 13 record, the most wins in school history by a quarterback. The naval academy retired Reynolds’ number, 19, making him the fourth person in school history to have this honor.
Reynolds stellar collegiate performance caught the eye of many NFL teams. Former Secretary of Defense Ash Carter granted Reynolds the rare opportunity to further his football career by allowing him to serve his obligated time as a reserve officer and complete his drill time in the off season.
“It’s a blessing to have the opportunity to be able to do both,” said Reynolds. “Playing football has always been a childhood dream and I’ve had a football in my hands as long as I can remember. I remember growing up and watching some of these guys play. So to be out here with them is surreal. It’s an interesting combination being on both sides of the coin.
“You’d be surprised, a lot of people here [in the NFL] want to know what we do on the military side and want to know about the academy and the process of how I serve,” he said. “On the flip side, when I drill, people want to know about the NFL, what life is like, what this player is like. It’s cool to have perspective from both of them and introduce people into new ways of thinking.”
Reynolds mentioned that making the switch from quarterback to receiver was tough after playing quarterback his whole life, but having many people invested in him at the academy has helped him immensely.
“Having mentors you can draw on and being an empty cup allows you to gain that knowledge and grow your leadership,” said Reynolds. “When you have graduated and are in the fleet, you have these four years of experiences from the academy to draw back on to be a good leader. I think that ties directly into football. I try to learn as much as I can off the field so that when I’m on the field … I can draw back on what I’ve learned and allow it to help me be more successful.”
Reynolds says he remembers his first year at the academy and that no privileges are guaranteed, very much like rookie season.
“[At the academy] you have to earn everything and respect your elders,” said Reynolds. “It’s kind of the same thing as a rookie. You’re coming into a place where people have been playing for years and have tremendous experience. You have to respect that and be willing to be a follower. There’s a bunch of little tricks of the trade that people don’t know about and you don’t know in college. When you get [to the NFL] you have to be humble enough to serve. So I think that humility instilled in me early on at the academy from really helped me my rookie year.”
Reynolds was selected to play in the 2016 East-West Shrine games but was unable to play due to back pain. Even though he never stepped foot on the field he was awarded the Pat Tillman award, presented to a player who shows the best character, sportsmanship and service both on and off the field.
“[The NFL] is a little different than expected; it’s a learning process and having the experience from the academy was a learning process as well,” said Reynolds. “I think being at the academy has helped me navigate through the NFL. It isn’t easy. The academy isn’t easy. There’s going to be some ups and downs. The whole point of it is being able to push through and have perseverance and being able to find the light at the end of the tunnel.”
For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cole C. Pielop

RENTON, Wash. – It’s nothing new for a Sailor to have a sea bag full of uniforms, but for Lt. j.g. Keenan Reynolds, his bag is a little heavier. There is one extra uniform, that of a Seattle Seahawk.
Reynolds, a reserve cryptologic warfare officer and 2016 U.S. Naval Academy graduate, broke multiple records during his four years at the academy, including a 32 – 13 record, the most wins in school history by a quarterback. The naval academy retired Reynolds’ number, 19, making him the fourth person in school history to have this honor.
Reynolds stellar collegiate performance caught the eye of many NFL teams. Former Secretary of Defense Ash Carter granted Reynolds the rare opportunity to further his football career by allowing him to serve his obligated time as a reserve officer and complete his drill time in the off season.
“It’s a blessing to have the opportunity to be able to do both,” said Reynolds. “Playing football has always been a childhood dream and I’ve had a football in my hands as long as I can remember. I remember growing up and watching some of these guys play. So to be out here with them is surreal. It’s an interesting combination being on both sides of the coin.
“You’d be surprised, a lot of people here [in the NFL] want to know what we do on the military side and want to know about the academy and the process of how I serve,” he said. “On the flip side, when I drill, people want to know about the NFL, what life is like, what this player is like. It’s cool to have perspective from both of them and introduce people into new ways of thinking.”
Reynolds mentioned that making the switch from quarterback to receiver was tough after playing quarterback his whole life, but having many people invested in him at the academy has helped him immensely.
“Having mentors you can draw on and being an empty cup allows you to gain that knowledge and grow your leadership,” said Reynolds. “When you have graduated and are in the fleet, you have these four years of experiences from the academy to draw back on to be a good leader. I think that ties directly into football. I try to learn as much as I can off the field so that when I’m on the field … I can draw back on what I’ve learned and allow it to help me be more successful.”
Reynolds says he remembers his first year at the academy and that no privileges are guaranteed, very much like rookie season.
“[At the academy] you have to earn everything and respect your elders,” said Reynolds. “It’s kind of the same thing as a rookie. You’re coming into a place where people have been playing for years and have tremendous experience. You have to respect that and be willing to be a follower. There’s a bunch of little tricks of the trade that people don’t know about and you don’t know in college. When you get [to the NFL] you have to be humble enough to serve. So I think that humility instilled in me early on at the academy from really helped me my rookie year.”
Reynolds was selected to play in the 2016 East-West Shrine games but was unable to play due to back pain. Even though he never stepped foot on the field he was awarded the Pat Tillman award, presented to a player who shows the best character, sportsmanship and service both on and off the field.
“[The NFL] is a little different than expected; it’s a learning process and having the experience from the academy was a learning process as well,” said Reynolds. “I think being at the academy has helped me navigate through the NFL. It isn’t easy. The academy isn’t easy. There’s going to be some ups and downs. The whole point of it is being able to push through and have perseverance and being able to find the light at the end of the tunnel.”
For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cole C. Pielop

RENTON, Wash. – It’s nothing new for a Sailor to have a sea bag full of uniforms, but for Lt. j.g. Keenan Reynolds, his bag is a little heavier. There is one extra uniform, that of a Seattle Seahawk.
Reynolds, a reserve cryptologic warfare officer and 2016 U.S. Naval Academy graduate, broke multiple records during his four years at the academy, including a 32 – 13 record, the most wins in school history by a quarterback. The naval academy retired Reynolds’ number, 19, making him the fourth person in school history to have this honor.
Reynolds stellar collegiate performance caught the eye of many NFL teams. Former Secretary of Defense Ash Carter granted Reynolds the rare opportunity to further his football career by allowing him to serve his obligated time as a reserve officer and complete his drill time in the off season.
“It’s a blessing to have the opportunity to be able to do both,” said Reynolds. “Playing football has always been a childhood dream and I’ve had a football in my hands as long as I can remember. I remember growing up and watching some of these guys play. So to be out here with them is surreal. It’s an interesting combination being on both sides of the coin.
“You’d be surprised, a lot of people here [in the NFL] want to know what we do on the military side and want to know about the academy and the process of how I serve,” he said. “On the flip side, when I drill, people want to know about the NFL, what life is like, what this player is like. It’s cool to have perspective from both of them and introduce people into new ways of thinking.”
Reynolds mentioned that making the switch from quarterback to receiver was tough after playing quarterback his whole life, but having many people invested in him at the academy has helped him immensely.
“Having mentors you can draw on and being an empty cup allows you to gain that knowledge and grow your leadership,” said Reynolds. “When you have graduated and are in the fleet, you have these four years of experiences from the academy to draw back on to be a good leader. I think that ties directly into football. I try to learn as much as I can off the field so that when I’m on the field … I can draw back on what I’ve learned and allow it to help me be more successful.”
Reynolds says he remembers his first year at the academy and that no privileges are guaranteed, very much like rookie season.
“[At the academy] you have to earn everything and respect your elders,” said Reynolds. “It’s kind of the same thing as a rookie. You’re coming into a place where people have been playing for years and have tremendous experience. You have to respect that and be willing to be a follower. There’s a bunch of little tricks of the trade that people don’t know about and you don’t know in college. When you get [to the NFL] you have to be humble enough to serve. So I think that humility instilled in me early on at the academy from really helped me my rookie year.”
Reynolds was selected to play in the 2016 East-West Shrine games but was unable to play due to back pain. Even though he never stepped foot on the field he was awarded the Pat Tillman award, presented to a player who shows the best character, sportsmanship and service both on and off the field.
“[The NFL] is a little different than expected; it’s a learning process and having the experience from the academy was a learning process as well,” said Reynolds. “I think being at the academy has helped me navigate through the NFL. It isn’t easy. The academy isn’t easy. There’s going to be some ups and downs. The whole point of it is being able to push through and have perseverance and being able to find the light at the end of the tunnel.”
For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

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