Story by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang

BREMERTON, Washington – USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) reached the halfway point of its planned incremental availability (PIA), May 24.
John C. Stennis officially started its PIA Feb. 16, at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS) and Intermediate Maintenance Facility to undergo scheduled maintenance and upgrades.
“This is the largest six-month availability ever for a Nimitz-Class aircraft carrier. The fact that we are on schedule and tracking to complete on time is a testament to the PSNS, Stennis, and contractor team,” said Capt. Greg Huffman, John C. Stennis’ commanding officer.

PIA is a regularly scheduled part of a ship’s life cycle to overhaul systems, install upgrades and complete work difficult or impossible to do at sea or without shipyard experience.
Sailors and PSNS personnel are working together on the various upgrades and repairs needed for the ship, including work on the engineering systems, aircraft catapult, crew berthing, tanks and voids, piping systems, insulation, decks and more. The total work planned for John C. Stennis by Sailors and shipyard personnel will amount to more than 2,100,000 man-hours of work.
Teamwork has been essential to staying on top of the required workload and staying on schedule.
“This whole event is based on good team building that we [John C. Stennis Sailors and PSNS personnel] have been developing over the last year, even before the availability started with the shipyard,” said Cmdr. Ken Holland, John C. Stennis’ chief engineer, from Denver, Colorado. “Us working as a team each and every day has made a huge difference.”

While reaching the halfway point is a milestone for John C. Stennis Sailors and PSNS personnel, there is more work to do before PIA is over.

Each day brings new obstacles, but by communicating with one another, PSNS and John C. Stennis overcomes them.

“The critical thing is we know what needs to get done so that we can finish the availability,” said Holland. “Work together as a team and push her [John C. Stennis] out of here and back to sea.”

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mike Pernick

BREMERTON, Washington – Sailors from USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) celebrated Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month (AAPIHM) with an observance ceremony hosted by the Multi-Cultural Heritage Committee (MCHC), May 24.
The theme of this year’s event is “Unite Our Voices by Speaking Together.”
“For me it’s important to celebrate diversity because we have so much of it in the Navy,” said Machinist’s Mate 2nd Class Tanisha Strowbridge, a member of the MCHC and speaker at the event, from Atlanta. “I think it’s amazing that we observe so many cultures and include as many people as we can so that no one feels left out and we have a better understanding of each other.”
Guest speakers of various ranks, representing multiple countries and backgrounds, spoke about the influence their culture has had on their life, their career in the Navy and the important contributions of some Asian American and Pacific Islander pioneers.
Another guest speaker at the event, Hospitalman Tre Kubota, from Hau’ula-Kahuku, Hawaii, spoke about his upbringing and ethnic background.
“I’m really proud of where I’m from,” said Kubota. “Talking to other people and learning from them has made me realize there are so many interesting differences and things we have in common with each other.”
There are 24,473 Asian American and Pacific Islander Sailors currently serving in the Navy, including eight admirals, 318 officers and 659 master chief and senior chief petty officers. They represent more than 56 ethnic groups and speak more than 100 languages.
Concluding the event, guests were treated to assorted Asian American and Pacific Islander cuisine. Members from the MCHC also encouraged guests to celebrate the cultural differences that exist in the Navy and recognize the contributions that Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have accomplished in the Navy.
“Events like this bring people together,” said Kubota. “I’ve met people from all over the world and now have friends all over the place which is a reflection of this event.”

John C. Stennis is conducting a planned incremental availability (PIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.
For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dakota Rayburn

BREMERTON, Washington – Sailors from both aircraft carriers homeported at Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton Sailors worked together at a community service (COMSERV) project cleaning up Ivy Green Cemetery, May 19.

More than 40 Sailors from USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) and USS Nimitz (CVN 68) teamed up with volunteers from the local community to clean debris and overgrowth from the grounds in the 15-acre cemetery to honor the service members buried there for Memorial Day.

Sailors from John C. Stennis’ supply department conduct COMSERVs such as this every month as a means to give back to the community.

“I look forward … to coming out here and doing something with the community every month,” said Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Deprees Lindsay, from Mansfield, Ohio, assigned to John C. Stennis. “I like to come out here and show my support to all the vets that were before me and I’m pretty sure I can say the same about a lot of the other Sailors that are out here,”

Local community leaders also showed their support and assisted the Sailors and local volunteers in the clean up project.

“As part of our community service we come over here to help clean up the cemetery from time to time,” said Bremerton City Council Member Richard Huddy. “It helps to beautify the city and it also helps us to honor the veterans as we get ready for Memorial Day.”

Ivy Green Cemetery, a division of the Bremerton Parks and Recreation department, is the site of Bremerton’s “Tomb of the Unknown” monument, USS Saratoga Memorial and grave of Congressional Medal of Honor recipient John H. Nibbe, who was a Navy quartermaster during the Civil War.

According to Huddy, Marion “Mick” Hersey, a retired Navy senior chief petty officer, is primarily responsible for setting this project, and others like it, in motion. He said Hersey has a commitment to veterans and the memory of veterans, which is why this cemetery work is important to him.

“This has been one of my main focal points because I believe in honor and respect for our veterans,” said Hersey. “Besides this we take care of all the veteran’s memorials throughout town, all done with volunteer help.”

Volunteer Ramon Iniguez said Hersey brought the project to his attention and invited volunteers from his workplace to come out and help.

“I’m really glad that I’m out here to see what the people do to help out their community,” said Iniguez. “This is a big deal with Memorial Day weekend coming up and obviously we want to support the community.”

Huddy also commented on the importance of Sailors getting involved in their communities and how it was necessary to maintain certain projects within the city.

“I would tell [Sailors] that their contributions are very meaningful,” said Huddy. “We couldn’t get these kinds of things done without their help, and we hope that this sets a tone for their life where they will be involved in their communities no matter where they are.”

John C. Stennis is conducting a planned incremental availability (PIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist Third Class Aime Lykins

BREMERTON, Washington – USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) welcomed Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet Vice Adm. Nora Tyson, on an official visit, May 19.
Tyson is visiting the Pacific Northwest to speak with Sailors during various all-hands calls around Naval Base Kitsap and to serve as grand marshal of the 69th annual Bremerton Armed Forces Day Parade.
The parade is the largest and longest running Armed Forces Day parade in the nation and has an annual attendance of more than 25,000 people from western Washington.
“Vice Adm. Tyson is a ground breaking fleet admiral,” said Capt. Greg C. Huffman, commanding officer of John C. Stennis. “She has set new records on how to conduct fleet operations, command and control by pushing the 3rd Fleet forward.”
While onboard John C. Stennis, Tyson met with Sailors from each of the ship’s departments for a question and answer session, toured areas of the ship that have recently been updated, and met with ship’s leadership.
“Availabilities are all about being ready and flexible,” said Tyson during her address to the crew. “They are all about making sure that our ships, our people and our equipment is ready and as modernized as it can be so that when our country needs us, we are ready to go do whatever mission that platform is capable of doing. You are about half way through your maintenance availability, PIA [planned incremental maintenance availability], and you guys have done a great job.”
Tyson took time to congratulate the crew on the recently awarded Battle ‘E’ designation and spoke about the importance of readiness and flexibility while addressing the current missions of the 3rd Fleet’s numerous commands.
“You had a great deployment, everything that Stennis has touched has been golden, so I really want to say thank you to you guys for what you are doing,” said Tyson.
John C. Stennis is conducting a PIA at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.
For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nick A. Grim

BREMERTON, Washington – Sailors aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) are rehabilitating and refreshing 29 crew berthings during the ship’s Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) period.

The John C. Stennis berthing rehabitability team, one of the many specialized PIA teams, has been working on the berthings over a four-month period to provide added comfort for the crew.

“Everything you see when you walk into a berthing, we rip it out and replace it,” said Chief Cryptologic Technician (Collection) Matthew Ward, the John C. Stennis berthing rehab team leader from Fresno, California.

In addition to new equipment in berthing, the rehab team coordinates with the ship’s paint team to ensure fresh coats of paint are put on the bulkheads, and the deck and tile team replace the old tile with different flooring such as PRC, a wear-resistant type of flooring designed to reduce maintenance hours and costs.

“The old berthings were in need of new paint and ventilation systems,” said Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Cristo Salazar, from San Antonio. “The new berthings give us a new start and appreciation.”

While the updates keep the ship up to contemporary standards and looking fresh, the rehabilitation will increase crew morale during the work-up cycle and following deployment.

“I think having a nice berthing is one of the biggest things you can do to have decent morale on the ship,” said Ward. “Nobody wants to live in a not-so-nice area, everything clean and new, I think that’s something everyone on the ship deserves.”

John C. Stennis’ berthing rehab team has already completed more than ten berthings and is ahead of schedule.

“Leading the rehab team was an opportunity to work with different departments and lead a lot of Sailors,” said Ward. “The team of 70 Sailors I have working for me has been exceeding work timelines. This team works really hard and we wouldn’t be where we are without them.”

John C. Stennis is conducting a planned incremental availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mike Pernick

BREMERTON, Washington – Sailors temporarily assigned to USS John C. Stennis’ (CVN 74) planned incremental availability’s (PIA) deck and tile team are now replacing the tile decks with a new coating referred to as PRC, after its manufacturer, Products Research and Chemical Corporation .

PRC is a marine deck-coating made of a resin sealer and color epoxy that is designed to resist heavy abrasion, impact and other potential movements.

“The application process is really easy since it’s similar to painting,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 1st Class Alec Weeks, leading petty officer of the deck and tile team from Troy, Illinois. “With the new PRC decks all we have to do to keep them looking immaculate is a quick sweep and swab, no more stripping and waxing.”

Besides being easier to maintain, PRC coincidentally enhances John C. Stennis’ performance.

“It requires no underlayment which reduces the amount of weight we are adding to the ship,” added Weeks.

Having Sailors trained to install this deck surface also enhances the ship’s self-sufficiency. The skills they have learned will continue to be employed for future deck installations after the ship leaves the shipyard environment.

Weeks also praised his Sailors on their hard work and commitment to their temporarily assigned jobs.

“They are very passionate about this process and it shows,” said Weeks. “I couldn’t be more proud of the Sailors on the deck and tile team.”

John C. Stennis is conducting a PIA at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mike Pernick

BREMERTON, Washington – Sailors temporarily assigned to USS John C. Stennis’ (CVN 74) planned incremental availability’s (PIA) deck and tile team are now replacing the tile decks with a new coating referred to as PRC, after its manufacturer, Products Research and Chemical Corporation .

PRC is a marine deck-coating made of a resin sealer and color epoxy that is designed to resist heavy abrasion, impact and other potential movements.

“The application process is really easy since it’s similar to painting,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 1st Class Alec Weeks, leading petty officer of the deck and tile team from Troy, Illinois. “With the new PRC decks all we have to do to keep them looking immaculate is a quick sweep and swab, no more stripping and waxing.”

Besides being easier to maintain, PRC coincidentally enhances John C. Stennis’ performance.

“It requires no underlayment which reduces the amount of weight we are adding to the ship,” added Weeks.

Having Sailors trained to install this deck surface also enhances the ship’s self-sufficiency. The skills they have learned will continue to be employed for future deck installations after the ship leaves the shipyard environment.

Weeks also praised his Sailors on their hard work and commitment to their temporarily assigned jobs.

“They are very passionate about this process and it shows,” said Weeks. “I couldn’t be more proud of the Sailors on the deck and tile team.”

John C. Stennis is conducting a PIA at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nick A. Grim

BREMERTON, Washington – Sailors from USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) volunteered their time at the Kitsap Rescue Mission, May 9.

John C. Stennis’ Women’s Enlisted Leadership program coordinated the volunteer event with the Kitsap Rescue Mission as an opportunity for Sailors to assist the organization with its many daily needs.

“What we do here is 90 percent volunteer based,” said Amy O’ Shaughnessy, the volunteer coordinator with Kitsap Rescue Mission.

During this community service event, John C. Stennis Sailors helped the Kitsap Rescue Mission by moving bags of donated clothing, demolishing drywall and extracting nails in the Kitsap Rescue Mission’s main building in downtown Bremerton, which is home to their donation offices and their day-room services.

“The presence of service members is pretty huge actually,” said O’Shaughnessy.

In addition to providing aid to the homeless and less fortunate in the community, the shelter offers volunteers the ability to give back as well as show compassion and understanding to those less fortunate.

“Based on experiences in my past, I understand the hardships that people go through, that’s why it’s important for me to come out and help out,” said Electrician’s Mate 3rd Class Matthew Hisermartinez, from North Adams, Massachusetts, “It’s important for John C. Stennis Sailors to come out and show that we want to give back to our community.”

The Kitsap Rescue Mission serves the community by providing a variety of services.

“We have everything from case management, which includes getting help with GED diplomas, paying court fines, family reconciliation, assisting with finding employment and more,” said O’Shaughnessy. “We also provide showers, clothing and toiletry donations, a day room service from nine to five, an overnight shelter and we provide meals.”

John C. Stennis is conducting a planned incremental availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman William Ford

BREMERTON, Washington (May 6, 2017) Eight Sailors assigned to USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) competed in the 25th Annual Armed Forces Culinary Competition at Olympic College, May 6.
The event, part of the city of Bremerton’s 69th Annual Armed Forces Festival, featured military chefs from 10 commands in the Pacific Northwest competing in several categories including appetizers, desserts, and a timed cooking challenge known as the “Battling Chef”.
“Showing off my culinary skills and representing JCS (John C. Stennis) at the same time gives me an enormous amount of pride,” said Culinary Specialist 1st Class David Houchins from Lexington, North Carolina. “Any time we CS’s (culinary specialist) can step out of the daily routine of following recipe cards and procedures to showcase our skills is what we love to do.”
Houchins, who considers his home town Lexington the barbecue capitol of the world, finished third in the ribs category. He and his counterpart’s dishes were judged based on originality, consistency, appearance and taste. The judges consisted of Navy officers and the Mayor of Bremerton, Patty Lent.
“From hors d’oeuvres to ribs to chili it’s pretty exciting for the community,” said Lent. “It’s the kickoff for our armed forces week and it has gathered a lot of attention not only locally but nationally as well.”
Along with Houchin’s third-place finish in the ribs category, Culinary Specialist 3rd Class James Bien, from Las Vegas, and Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Raquel Sumaoang, from Honolulu, took home third place in the wings category and John C. Stennis finished in third place in the overall competition.
The John C. Stennis team was comprised of Culinary Specialist 1st Class Tawney Holley, Culinary Specialist 1st Class David Houchins, Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Benjamin Lindsay, Culinary Specialist 3rd Class James Bien, Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Denmark Cortez, Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Juan Freas, Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Raquel Sumaoang and Culinary Specialist Seaman Khiem Nguyen.
John C. Stennis is conducting a planned incremental availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.
For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jackson G. Brown

SEATTLE – The Commanding Officer of USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) threw out the ceremonial first pitch before a Major League Baseball (MLB) game featuring the Seattle Mariners against the Texas Rangers, May 5.

Capt. Greg Huffman took the mound in front of 26,983 fans before the game at Safeco Field, home of the Seattle Mariners, throwing the first pitch to Capt. Scott Miller, John C. Stennis’ executive officer.

Cheering them on were more than 400 John C. Stennis Sailors, friends and families who were attending the game as part of “John C. Stennis Family Night,” organized by the ship’s Morale, Welfare, and Recreation department (MWR) and hosted by the Mariners.

“We have a great relationship with the Mariners, and it’s great to have them host John C. Stennis Night here,” said Huffman. “It’s a great opportunity for the Sailors to come out and enjoy some beautiful weather and the people of Seattle.”

The Seattle Mariners, established in 1977, are the only MLB team in the Pacific Northwest region, which has a significant naval presence. John C. Stennis, home ported in Bremerton, Washington, is one of two Nimitz-class aircraft carriers stationed in the region.

“We have a close relationship with the city of Bremerton, the city of Seattle, and all the sports teams down here.” said Huffman on the ties John C. Stennis has on the community.

The John C. Stennis Sailors in attendance took advantage of the opportunity to enjoy the game with a discounted ticket package thanks to the ship’s MWR.

“I think it’s great that MWR looks out for Sailors and provides us with an opportunity to go to these games,” said Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Kevin Mizgalski, from New York. “These [games] are some good ways to relax and take a load off.”

In the middle of a high-tempo Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) period at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, MWR events like John C. Stennis Family Night at SAFECO Field are a welcome break for Sailors who are looking to decompress after a busy week in the “yards.”

John C. Stennis is conducting a PIA at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

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