Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class David A. Cox

SINGAPORE – Sailors from USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 9 participated in a community service project at Willing Hearts Soup Kitchen in Chai Chee, Singapore, April 20.

Willing Hearts Soup Kitchen provides meals to low income families, the elderly and the disabled by cooking and packaging three meals a day, from sunrise to long after sunset.

More than 30 Sailors volunteered at the event, cooking more than 300 pounds of rice and creating approximately 5,000 meals.

Chief Machinist’s Mate Brandon Miller from Atlanta, one of the organizers for the volunteer event, said that having the extra people helped to give the regular volunteers a much-needed break.

“We had Sailors creating lunch boxes, cooking rice, frying food, cooking vegetables, bagging lunches, loading the lunches into delivery vehicles and unloading vegetables,” said Miller. “We finished 30 minutes earlier than usual, but that says a lot about how efficient the regular volunteers are since they don’t typically have 30 people to help them, and they do this all day, everyday. It’s amazing.”

Many of the recipients of the food from Willing Hearts Soup Kitchen are Singaporeans who are unable to leave their homes. Because of this, Willing Hearts delivers the food they make instead of serving from one central location. The lunches are sent to over 50 locations across Singapore. The facility uses only fresh meats and vegetables that are donated by local supermarkets from around the region.

“Coming out here has a direct and positive impact on the local community,” said Miller. “Some of the people working at the facility may never have seen U.S. Navy Sailors, so being able to work alongside them builds camaraderie and directly impacts their perception of each person, the Stennis crew, the U.S. Navy and the United States of America.”

Volunteer opportunities for Sailors continue to be rewarding experiences. Logistics Specialist Seaman Vanessa Abney from Spartanburg, S.C., one of the volunteers at the event, said that being able to help the local community filled her with a sense of pride.

“My favorite part of the event was looking around and seeing all my shipmates cooking, plating food and cleaning,” said Abney. “We weren’t thinking of anything else but feeding the hungry. It made me feel proud.”
Providing a ready force supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific, John C. Stennis is operating as part of the Great Green Fleet on a regularly scheduled 7th Fleet deployment.
For more news on USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Lt. Brendan Good

SOUTH CHINA SEA – Sailors aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) observed Passover with a traditional seder in the wardroom, April 25.

Despite being more than 10,000 miles from their families, Sailors sought to create a sense of community.

At the dinner, the seder plate took center stage, as the ship’s Supply Department and other organizations combined to provide matzah, horse radish, hardboiled eggs along with other required items. Sailors followed the same guidance as Jewish people around the world, retelling the story of slavery in Egypt, the ten plagues and exodus towards the Promised Land.
The event was open to the entire crew, as the holiday provides an opportunity to build a community around their common religion and culture.

Each Sailor has family at home who was practicing similar rituals. On the ship, Sailors continued the tradition of their ancestors by joining in with the Jewish community around the world in celebration of this event.

“I felt like I was at home, like a little kid again, back at the table,” said Electrician’s Mate 3rd Class Mitchell Dubin, from Sarasota, Fla. “We dress up in nice clothes and get together at the grandparent’s house, eat until we can’t move anymore, drink wine, be merry. There’s a reason it’s a two-hour ceremony.”

Many pieces of Sailors’ daily lives on an aircraft carrier are out of the ordinary, uncertain or high stress. One way to propagate a sense of normalcy is to carry on traditions and observe religious rituals as part of their busy weekly routine.

“It was great to get away from the everyday business and bustle of work down in the [propulsion] plant,” said Electrician’s Mate 2nd Class Andrew Pluss, from Denver. “It felt amazing getting back to my religion and celebrating a happy, yet sad, holiday that just brings me back home. Being able to do this on the ship provides that opportunity.”

The Jewish calendar is replete with holidays, remembrances and celebrations; one of the most significant is Passover. Like many religions, Judaism holds tradition paramount. This is why each Friday evening, the Jewish Sabbath, a group of Sailors from around the ship gathers together in the chapel. This simple observance is often enough to return Sailors to a positive frame of mind, reminding them of the importance of stepping back from looming deadlines or upcoming inspections, to practice their religion.

“Every Friday night at [6:oo p.m.] we have services in the chapel,” said Dubin. “I wish we did this every night. It brought us together for something very familiar and I am thankful for everyone involved who made it possible.”
Providing a ready force supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific, John C. Stennis is operating as part of the Great Green Fleet on a regularly scheduled 7th Fleet deployment.
For more news on USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Sierra D. Langdon

SINGAPORE – Sailors assigned to USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 9 visited with children at the International Community School in Singapore during a community service (COMSERV) project, April 20.
The visit began with an introduction to the school’s philosophy followed by arranging Sailors into groups to visit students in the elementary classrooms.

“I usually try to do a [COMSERV] in each port,” said Logistics Specialist 1st Class Nicholas Winkler, from Wichita, Kan. “I have two kids back home, so since I can’t be with my kids, I can volunteer with the children here to have the same feeling of being young and energetic.”
Sailors answered questions about life in the Navy, played games, and participated in science and art projects with the students.

In classrooms with older students, Sailors got an inside peek at a foreign education system before joining the students for lunch.

“My favorite part of the day was watching them work on fractions,” said Winkler. “There was a little girl who was playing a bracelet game based on fractions and she was zipping through them like they were nothing. It was impressive seeing what their curriculum enabled them to do.”
After lunch, the students and Sailors headed to the playground for recess where they played outdoor games, swung on swings and held races.

“Some of the other groups with the older kids played basketball while we went to the playground to play tag,” said Yeoman 2nd Class Luc-Rikardo Fils, from Fort Myers, Fla. “It was like being transported back in time. We all got to feel like we were kids again.”
At the end of the visit, the students and Sailors took pictures together and exchanged the paintings they had created earlier in the day. The Sailors said their goodbyes and headed back to the ship.

“I was sad to leave at the end,” said Fils. “Being in port is fun. Going out and seeing the country is amazing, but getting to meet the people is one of the greatest investments of our time. It’s incredibly rewarding as well.”
Providing a ready force supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific, John C. Stennis is operating as part of the Great Green Fleet on a regularly scheduled 7th Fleet deployment.
For more news on USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christopher Frost

SOUTH CHINA SEA – USS John C. Stennis’ (CVN 74) crew recently completed the Maintenance Material Management Inspection (3MI) and is now in the process of implementing more energy efficient lighting throughout the ship.
This effort is part of the U.S. Navy’s Great Green Fleet initiative, highlighting efficient and alternative energy use to boost combat effectiveness, maximize strategic options, and better protect Sailors and Marines.

Energy efficient lighting is one measure used to increase operational capability.
The ship’s emergency lights, known as battle lanterns, currently use incandescent bulbs, but are being converted to Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) to reduce energy consumption, maintenance hours and waste.
LEDs consume less energy and have a longer life span than incandescent or fluorescent lighting. While incandescent light bulbs have a lifespan of 100 hours of use, LED bulbs are rated for 100,000 hours of service life, “effectively making the upgrade to the LED assembly a one-time purchase,” said Chief Electrician’s Mate Joey Crow, John C. Stennis’ Electrical Safety Chief, from Victoria, Texas.

LEDs have also been linked to reduced maintenance accidents and injuries because of the longer lifespan and decreased maintenance requirements.
Additionally, John C. Stennis Sailors are making the switch to rechargeable batteries for the battle lanterns to further reduce waste and maintenance requirements, according to Lt. Mike Berberich, from Milan, Ill., John C. Stennis’ electrical officer.
“Switching over to more energy efficient equipment will reduce costs and decrease maintenance in the long run,” said Berberich. “The bulbs will also last longer in an emergency situation because of their reduced energy consumption.”
The new LED assembly provides 30 hours of continuous light before draining its batteries, said Crow.
Providing a ready force supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific, John C. Stennis is operating as part of the Great Green Fleet on a regularly scheduled 7th Fleet deployment.
For more news on USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Cole C. Pielop

WATERS SURROUNDING THE KOREAN PENINSULA – USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) and Republic of Korea navy (ROKN) destroyer Gang Gam-chan (DDH 979), worked together to land aircraft during exercise Foal Eagle, March 23.
The landing signal officer (LSO) has mere seconds to determine how low or high an aircraft is coming in and whether to signal the aircraft to land or to wave it off.

On especially dark nights, when the LSO can’t see the horizon line, a ship called the horizon reference unit (HRU) is used to signify the horizon.
“When there is no horizon, a destroyer or cruiser will be brought about a mile-and-a-half off of the starboard stern of the carrier,” said Lt. Bobby Richards, a tactical action officer for John C. Stennis, from Fredericksburg, Va. “The lights from the ship let the LSO determine an aircraft’s positioning.”
The HRU ship turns off all their lights except a mast light which indicates the horizon.
“Imagine you are in a dark gym and someone points a laser pointer at the wall and asks how high it is,” said Lt. Cmdr. David Wrigley, an LSO from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 9, from Olive Branch, Miss. “You just don’t know, especially when it’s a few hundred yards away. It’s the same for us when an aircraft is coming in. The HRU provides us a reference instead of just guessing.”
Moon brightness, fog and the sea roughness play a role in how critical it is to have an HRU and make clear communication a key factor.
“Communicating with another nation’s navy isn’t always easy,” said Richards. “It all depends on the captain’s experience being an HRU. If the unit hasn’t done [it] before we will station them a little farther back and see how they operate. If it goes well we will pull them closer so the LSO has a better reference.”

Training another navy’s ship to be an HRU builds the interoperability between the nations, one of exercise Foal Eagle’s goals.
“It’s awesome that we can use another nation’s navy as an HRU,” said Richards. “Just because we are from a different country and serve different navies, we still do the same job.”

Foal Eagle is a series of joint and combined field training exercises conducted by U.S. and ROK Combined Forces Command (CFC) and United States Forces Korea (USFK) component commands (ground, air, naval, and special operations) taking place on the Korean peninsula and surrounding waters. The John C. Stennis Strike Group participated in the Maritime Counter Special Operations Force (MCSOF) portion of the exercise, which wrapped up March 24.

Providing a ready force supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific, John C. Stennis is operating as part of the Great Green Fleet on a regularly scheduled 7th Fleet deployment.

For more news on USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christopher Frost

WESTERN PACIFIC – USS John C. Stennis’ (CVN 74) First Class Petty Officer Association (FCPOA) invites Sailors to the forecastle every Sunday to participate in John C. Stennis University (JCSU).
JCSU offers Sailors training related to basic military readiness (BMR), the enlisted surface warfare specialist (ESWS) qualification and enlisted air warfare specialist (EAWS) qualification.
“It’s an opportunity for Sailors, especially those who can’t attend regular training, to get the information they need,” said Logistics Specialist 1st Class Nicholas Winkler, from Wichita, Kan., an instructor for JCSU. “It also gives Sailors a support network and puts faces to the board members they might see again while they’re working towards their qualifications.”
Winkler added that JCSU gives Sailors an advantage by providing the material they need to know in a different format.
“It creates an environment where Sailors are actually learning about the ship, not just memorizing specific answers,” said Winkler.
JCSU rotates through different topics every week, typically cycling between ESWS, EAWS and BMR. Each one of those subjects requires multiple sessions for complete training.
Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Chelsea Beckwith, from Cooperstown, N.Y., assigned to the Warhawks of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 97, attended ESWS training.
“I came to JCSU to get any information I could to help me get my [ESWS] pin,” said Beckwith. “Since I’m stationed with a squadron, I’m unfamiliar with the ship. It was helpful to be taught the information instead of just trying to study it out of a book.”
Providing a ready force supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific, John C. Stennis is operating as part of the Great Green Fleet on a regularly scheduled 7th Fleet deployment.
For more news on USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Dakota Rayburn

WESTERN PACIFIC – This April, Sailors aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) are leading efforts to educate Sailors in observance of Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention (SAAPM) Month.

SAAPM was created to eliminate the crime of sexual assault and make sure service members are treated with dignity and respect.

The Navy implemented the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) program to eliminate sexual assault. The goal of SAPR is to change attitudes and behaviors in the Navy and support a culture of professionalism, respect and trust. One way this is accomplished is through victim advocates.

“[The victim advocate’s mission is] to create a safe space for victims and ensure that they know their rights and resources,” said Karen Christensen, John C. Stennis’ deployed resiliency counselor.

Air Traffic Controller 2nd Class Jacquelyn Parra, from Manteca, Calif., said John C. Stennis’ victim advocates actively strive to cultivate a safe environment for the crew through training. They are combating the stigmas associated with reporting an assault. Those stigmas are detrimental to the victim and workplace and can make a person unwilling to seek help if they’ve been assaulted. She said the victim advocates are a good resource for Sailors with questions about sexual assault.

“If [SAPR victim advocates] don’t know the answer to your question, we know where to find the answer to your question,” said Parra, a victim advocate aboard John C. Stennis.
People who get counseling from an advocate are not required to file a report, but there are two types of reports Sailors can file: unrestricted and restricted. In both types of reports, the victim will be given care and treatment but an unrestricted report will begin an open investigation into the incident. This requires full disclosure and cooperation from everyone involved while details and names are kept confidential on a need-to-know basis.

Once an unrestricted report is made it cannot be reverted to a restricted report. However a restricted report means an incident will not be investigated, but the victim will still be treated, cared for, counseled and have the option of filing an unrestricted report.

To file a report, or to get counseling and advice, Sailors can speak to the sexual assault resiliency counselor (SARC), any SAPR victim advocate, chaplain, or health care professional. Sailors seeking advice or help should always confirm with their counselor the extent of their confidentiality and what they are obliged to report. Chaplains, for example, have complete confidentiality, but a work center supervisor is obligated to file an unrestricted report if there is an assault.

SAPR victim advocates aboard John C. Stennis are hosting a competition to educate Sailors on the available options to prevent and respond to sexual assault. Departments throughout the ship decorate their doors to help Sailors better understand the SAPR program.

The display must include the slogan “Eliminate Sexual Assault: Know your part. Do your part.” to fit this year’s theme. At the end of the competition, the victim advocates will decide which department best accomplished that goal.
Providing a ready force supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific, John C. Stennis is operating as part of the Great Green Fleet on a regularly scheduled 7th Fleet deployment.
For more news on USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Rayburn

WESTERN PACIFIC- Chief petty officers (CPO) aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) celebrated the 123rd birthday of the CPO rank, April 1.

This year’s celebration was organized into a series of events to commemorate the chiefs’ naval heritage.

Chiefs came together during a CPO only physical training session at 5 a.m. in the hangar bay followed by a recital of Anchors Aweigh at its completion. Afterward, CPOs took the place of junior Sailors to serve the crew lunch on both mess decks.

“I like doing things for the crew and just having some fun,” said Senior Chief Engineman Rob Zantow from Gillette, Wyo., who served lunch on both the forward and aft mess decks.
Later, CPOs hosted a birthday dinner and a cake cutting ceremony for ship and squadron leaders in the Chiefs Mess. The celebration culminated with a showing of the movie “Men of Honor.”

Chief petty officer was established on April 1, 1893. Prior to then and for many years thereafter, commanding officers could promote petty officers to acting appointments to fill vacancies in ship’s compliments. If service was satisfactory, the commanding officer could recommend to the Bureau of Navigation (Bureau of Personnel, BUPERS, after Oct. 1, 1942) that an individual be given a permanent appointment for the rate being served.

With more than a century of legacy, CPOs have had a significant influence on naval life. Chief petty officers are often referred to as deck plate leaders for the role they play in Sailors’ lives. They guide and train junior Sailors and officers, filling the role of a mentor.

According to Chief Legalman Tanica Bagmon from Fort Washington, Md., it is a chief’s job to set and maintain standards.

“[I like] the mentoring, being able to lead young Sailors,” said Bagmon. “It’s all about being able to pick Sailors up and guide them in the direction they should be going.”

Zantow said CPOs’ greatest responsibility is to train their reliefs. Chiefs are meant to help their junior Sailors find the right answers. It’s up to the current chiefs to help junior Sailors grow to fill the roles they leave behind.

“It’s not acceptable to say, ‘I don’t know’, and let it die, you have to say, ‘I don’t know, and I will get back to you,'” said Zantow. “No matter how trivial it might seem to you, it’s not trivial to the person that asked.”

According to Chief Aircrew Survival Equipmentman Carl Smith of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 71, from Albemarle, N.C., the qualities that make a good chief can be adopted at all levels.

“You don’t ever accomplish your goals by yourself,” said Smith. “It’s not about trying to make chief, it’s about bringing everybody up with you. If you focus on the success of the team then everybody succeeds, not just one person.”

Providing a ready force supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific, John C. Stennis is operating as part of the Great Green Fleet on a regularly scheduled 7th Fleet deployment.

For more news from John C. Stennis strike group visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or http://www.facebook.com/stennis 74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Andre T. Richard

WESTERN PACIFIC – Tattoos have long been a part of culture and tradition around the world.

According to “Tattoo History Source Book” by Steve Gilbert, Ancient Egyptians used them as therapeutic or medicinal remedies. Japanese Samurai, who were forced to disband and burn their armor, used full body tattoos to replace the armor stripped from them, according to Margaret Lock in the Encyclopedia of World Cultures “Japanese” volume. Maori leaders of New Zealand used their personal family facial tattoo, or “moko,” to symbolize achievements and sign treaties according to National Geographic article “Tattoo Pigments of Imagination” by Cassandra Franklin-Barbajosa.

Tattoos are an evolving art form and Sailors aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) have a variety of tattoos ranging from traditional to modern.

“I am Hawaiian, Samoan, Filipino and Japanese and all those art forms are on my body,” said Hospitalman Tre Kobota, from Hauula, Hawaii.

In Samoan culture, full body tattoos are considered a rite of passage. They take multiple sessions and can be extremely painful.

“It’s the pain that shows not only physical but emotional strength,” said Kobota. “Tattoos, positive or negative, are a form of expression and that pain is a reminder.”

Sailors around the globe are responsible for tattoos’ migration and popularity in Western society. The word tattoo comes from the Tahitian word “tatau,” which Capt. James Cook introduced into the English language from his expeditions to Polynesia in the late 1700s (Franklin-Barbajosa).

Tattoos became popular among American sailors following the Revolutionary War. They would get tattoos to distinguish themselves from British sailors and avoid being forced into public service for British Royal navy ships (Gilbert). As tattoos moved around the globe, their symbolism evolved over time.

Tattoos of swallows represented a safe journey home; they also represented every 5,000 nautical miles a Sailor traveled. A dagger through the heart symbolized the end of a relationship due to unfaithfulness, and was commonly adorned with a ribbon saying ‘Death Before Dishonour.’ Some of the more common Navy tattoos are simply Sailors’ rating badges.

“I have a tattoo of the helm wheel because it deals with my rate as a quartermaster, which is one of the oldest [rates],” said Senior Chief Quartermaster Henry Nicol, from Hemet, Calif. “I have tattoos that represent who I am as a Sailor and as a chief.”

Tattoo artists like Norman Keith Collins, aka “Sailor Jerry,” created a standard for traditional Naval tattoos in the late 1960s. With technological advances, like evolving from boar’s tusks to needles, artists are able to create tattoos with more details and color.

“Some people like the old style of tattoos with solid black lines [and] little color or shading,” said Legalman 1st Class Christopher Ash, from Bartlett, Ill. “Then there are those of us who like the modern day art with more detail and shading.”
Tattoos can mean a lot to an individual, so figuring out what to get can take some thought.

“Each one of my tattoos symbolizes something significant in my life,” said Ash. “I take what I observe and what I do and put it into my artwork to be reflected onto my body.” Attitudes and Navy policy about tattoos have changed over time as well.

On March 31, the Navy updated its tattoo policy with the release of NAVADMIN 082/16. The instruction, which goes into effect April 30, allows Sailors to have one tattoo on their neck that does not exceed one inch in any direction and have visible tattoos below the elbow or knee, with no restriction on size or amount. The policy update will also allow Sailors with arm length tattoos, or sleeves, to be assigned to Recruit Training Command and Recruiting Command positions, which was previously not allowed.

“The instruction clearly states it was changed to allow more people to join the military,” said Nicol. “Before, having a tattoo was kind of taboo, and now almost everybody has a tattoo.”
The tattoo policy will not only allow more people the opportunity to serve but will also open up more opportunities for those already serving.
“More and more people are coming in with not only tattoos, but tattoos that are visible [in uniform],” said Ash. “The Navy allowing us to have these visible tattoos means that they are not only starting to embrace the cultural shift but also recognize that people can come in and still do a job despite what ink they have on their skin.”

Tattoo art has been engrained in Sailor culture since the first days of the Navy. The art has changed over time with trends, culture and advances in technology. With the update to the Navy’s tattoo policy, Sailors will be able to put links to their past on themselves and carry a permanent reminder with them to the future.

Providing a ready force supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific, John C. Stennis is operating as part of the Great Green Fleet on a regularly scheduled 7th Fleet deployment.
For more news on John C. Stennis visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christopher Frost

WATERS SURROUNDING THE KOREAN PENINSULA – Sailors aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) attended a career fair on the ship’s aft mess decks and training room complex, March 26.

Navy career counselors and experts from different rates and communities displayed information about cross rating opportunities, officer packages, reenlistment eligibility, special programs, and more.
“On deployment, people get into a groove and forget about some of the opportunities they have,” said Navy Counselor 1st Class Brendon Hart, from Salem, Ohio, assigned to the Raptors of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 71. “The career fair is a way to prominently display this information and remind Sailors about their options.”
It is important for Sailors interested in any packages or special programs to stay up-to-date, because the protocols can change rapidly, explained Hart. Navy career counselors are the most reliable source for information, and they are at every Sailor’s disposal.

“We hold the tools to help Sailors enhance their careers and achieve their goals, both professionally and personally,” said Hart.

For Sailors interested in striking or cross rating, nine representatives from different rates educated Sailors about their community. Each speaker gave information about day-to-day duties, shore rotation, possible duty stations and requirements for joining their rates.

Information Systems Technician (IT) 1st Class Zachary James, from Seattle, focused his presentation on the application of his rate’s knowledge in the civilian sector.

“I broke down the different disciplines of being an IT, the day-to-day activities as well as the benefits we take advantage of,” said James.

Seaman Jovonte Brown, from Arlington, Ga., learned about the master-at-arms rate, which he intends to strike for.

“I was really impressed by the presentation,” said Brown. “[The presenters] showed all the unique training, duty stations and civilian qualifications the rate offers.”
Providing a ready force supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific, John C. Stennis is operating as part of the Great Green Fleet on a regularly scheduled 7th Fleet deployment.
For more news on USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

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