Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mike Pernick

BREMERTON, Washington – Sailors from USS John C. Stennis’ (CVN 74) combat systems department completed a major readiness assessment, July 21.

A Combat Systems, Command, Control, Communications and Computer Readiness Assessment (C5RA) consists of more than 5,000 checks that verify missile fire controls, radio systems, radar and TV systems. The testing involves operating each piece of equipment to check for missing or broken parts as well as verifying good working condition.

“The C5RA inspection is important because throughout this [planned incremental] availability most of our equipment has been dormant,” said Fire Controlman Senior Chief Kenneth Mobley, combat systems maintenance manager and maintenance branch leading chief petty officer, from Tinley Park, Illinois. “When we turned our equipment back on we faced some issues which were fortunately…only minor fixes.”

Combat systems Sailors started preparing for this assessment weeks in advance.

“We started preparing weeks ahead of time,” said Electronics Technician 3rd Class Mikaela Stinnett, from Chesterfield, Virginia. “We checked lights, fuses, made sure all of our test equipment was calibrated and our spaces were clean.”

Toward the end of the availability period, John C. Stennis brought 83 subject-matter experts from 12 different organizations onboard to assess and assist with more than 3,500 pieces of equipment and address hundreds of discrepancies and deficiencies.

“It was a great learning opportunity for us, and especially our new sailors,” said Electronics Technician 2nd Class Randall Bendura, from Central Square, New York. “Almost all of the inspectors were retired chiefs who really knew their stuff and helped us become more familiar with our equipment.”

Combat systems Sailors rose to every challenge during this assessment.

“As a whole it really elevated my expectations of what well-equipped and engaged Sailors can do,” said Mobley. “There were a lot of obstacles leading up to the assessment and major production work that didn’t always go as expected, but our Sailors really buckled down. It was gratifying and they were nothing short of outstanding.”

The successful completion of this assessment is a major milestone in preparation for the ship’s upcoming sea trials and return to operations at sea.

John C. Stennis is conducting a planned incremental availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Ikenna Tanaka

BREMERTON, Washington – Sailors assigned to USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) spent their first night sleeping onboard following six months of living on a service barge when the ship reached the major milestone of crew move aboard (CMA), July 20.
CMA occurs as John C. Stennis approaches the end of its planned incremental availability (PIA), bringing the ship’s habitability services back aboard and moving closer to being a self-sustaining city at sea, ready to return to operations afloat.
While there are always crewmembers onboard standing various watches, and some Sailors returned to sleeping onboard early to support critical systems, it was the first night in which all departments and Sailors could stay aboard.
“Having the ship come back to life is a significant milestone for us,” said Cmdr. Jason Warner, John C. Stennis’ supply officer, from Warren, Ohio. “It was a great team effort when it came to the shipyard’s workers, private contractors and Sailors working together. When you have the right synergy of these three teams working together, you can put out a really good product.”
During PIA, the spaces and habitability services were unavailable. Plumbing systems, galley services, and many of the sleeping quarters were inaccessible due to extensive maintenance and upgrades on shipboard systems. As a result, the crew moved off the ship, staying at a nearby berthing barge which provided temporary accommodations while the crew worked on the ship in partnership with the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility team.
The ship had extensive work done on several systems tied to life onboard, including new racks in rehabilitated berthing spaces, new ovens in the galleys, a completely redesigned barber shop, and refurbished ship store spaces. Maintenance and repairs were also conducted on the water and plumbing systems onboard.
As a part of returning the ship to normal operations, the ship’s galleys served their first meals during breakfast on July 19, which included scrambled or hard-boiled eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, pancakes and omelets. Electronics Technician 2nd Class James Stachura, from Germantown, Maryland, received the first meal aboard the ship.
“It’s pretty nice to have the services of the ship back and not have the hassle of going to the barge anymore,” said Stachura. “Now I’ll be able to get more work done without having to take as much time off to go somewhere else to get something to eat.”
The ship reopened the newly designed barbershop, where Capt. Scott Miller, John C. Stennis’ executive officer, received the first haircut from Ship’s Serviceman Seaman Stephanie Santana, from Hialeah, Florida.
“The S-5 [hotel services] division did a phenomenal job redesigning the barbershop,” said Lt. Cmdr. Ryan Tobin, John C. Stennis’ assistant supply officer, from Modesto, California. “With the new theme of the Pacific Northwest environment, the new paint job, surrounding pictures and seats inside the shop, it gives Sailors a warm, home feeling when we’re underway. I think they will find it re-invigorating when they go to get a haircut. I’m proud of their [S-5] accomplishment and believe that the crew will be as well.”
Along with having barbershop services available aboard again, the ship’s morale, welfare and recreation coffee shop, Java John’s, and the newly refurbished ship’s convenience store, reopened stocked with food and other items.
“It was key that the crew took a lot of ownership in these projects in preparing to make the ship serviceable,” said Warner. “It brought a lot of energy and thought into the project, that’s why I think everything turned out so well. I believe the crew will be pleased and feel that the quality of life aboard the ship has improved.”
With the ship habitable and crew services up and running again, John C. Stennis is one major step closer to returning to sea and supporting America’s interests around the globe.
John C. Stennis is conducting a planned incremental availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.
For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang

BREMERTON, Washington – Sailors from USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) attended ‘Change the Culture’ training from U.S. Pacific Fleet’s (PACFLT) sexual assault prevention and response officer (SAPRO), July 14.

Rather than just teaching Sailors how to react to sexual assault and destructive behaviors, the training lead by PACFLT SAPRO Capt. Roy Nafarrete focused on getting to the cultural roots of the problem.

“We are used to things like bystander intervention and consent and this is good. The ‘Change the Culture’ training really tries to get underneath that, to try and cultivate character in people so they won’t even get in those types of situations,” said Cmdr. Carey Cash, John C. Stennis’ command chaplain, from Memphis, Tennessee.

During the presentation, Nafarrete primarily addressed Sailors who were midlevel leaders.

“The critical middle, the work center supervisors, leading petty officers and chiefs, and the divisional officers, they’re going to be the ones that have more routine and regular contact with Sailors, they’re going to be the ones that notice the culture of their work centers and where it may be going adrift,” said Cash.

One of Nafarrete’s key points was self-introspection, how Sailors may be unknowingly contributing to a negative culture and how they can begin positively influencing others by being more aware of their own actions.

“I thought the training was pretty good … it showed how a lot of us are stuck in our own ways,” said Aviation Administration man 1st Class Kortney Gandy, from Darlington, South Carolina. “I have a strong sense of humor and I like to joke around but some of the jokes could be offensive to someone and I may not know that. I have to be aware of the things that I say.”

‘Change the Culture’ is not a mandatory Navy training but a resource that PACFLT offers to the Navy.

For more information about ‘Change the Culture,’ contact pacfltsapro@navy.mil.

John C. Stennis is conducting a planned incremental availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.
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Story by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Nick A. Grim

BREMERTON, Washington – Sailors from USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) and shipyard workers from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility completed reattaching the ship’s anchors, July 14.
Both 30 ton anchors and their chains were removed May 16 for required preservation maintenance that occurs every 36 months.

“All the Sailors involved put in a lot of hard work and labor,” said Chief Boatswain’s Mate Edgar Montano, from Los Angeles. “The preservation usually takes a month to complete, but we finished the preservation in nearly three weeks.”

As the maintenance is only completed every three years, this was the first time many of the junior Sailors took part in this maintenance.

“The maintenance includes the inspection and preservation of the anchor and chain, removing rust, repainting, re-greasing and putting the detachable parts back together,” said Boatswain’s Mate 1st Class Bryan Pentland, from Washington, Pennsylvania.

The maintenance ensures proper upkeep of the utilized portion of the anchor and chain.

“The anchor and windlass are essential to functionality and the ability to get underway,” said Montano. “Due to safety of navigation, a ship cannot get underway unless it has the ability to drop anchor.”
Montano stressed that the ship’s anchoring equipment and the ability to conduct scheduled and emergency anchorages are critical to safety of navigation.

With its anchors reattached, John C. Stennis is one step closer to completion of its planned incremental availability (PIA) and returning to operations at sea.

John C. Stennis is conducting a PIA at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang

BREMERTON, Washington – Sailors from USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) conducted damage control and medical trainings during three damage control “rodeo” events held aboard the decommissioned carrier USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) May 16-18, June 13-15 and July 11-13.

John C. Stennis’ damage control and medical departments were unable to hold the “rodeos” on their own ship due to maintenance work being conducted during its planned incremental availability (PIA), but still wanted to give their fellow Sailors the most realistic experience possible.

Enter ex-Kitty Hawk, the Navy’s last conventional-powered aircraft carrier, held at Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility Bremerton, and just a quick walk away from John C. Stennis. Though Kitty Hawk was decommissioned in 2009, it remains largely intact and shares many basic similarities to modern Nimitz-class aircraft carriers, making it an ideal location for this type of training.

“To be able to use a retired aircraft carrier, with as much space as there was, affords us the opportunity to keep our Sailors trained while performing the maximum amount of maintenance aboard the ship during the availability,” said Cmdr. Ken Holland, John C. Stennis’ Chief Engineer, from Littleton, Colorado.

John C. Stennis Sailors responded enthusiastically to the opportunity to train aboard Kitty Hawk.

“This gets people excited,” said Lt. Ruth Johns, John C. Stennis’ ship’s nurse officer, from Flagstaff, Arizona. “This [damage control rodeo] just contributes to making it more real. It gets everybody back into the training mindset and really focusing on the mission.”

Sailors received hands on training with damage control equipment at multiple stations set up throughout Kitty Hawk’s hangar bay and on the pier, including dressing out and working in firefighting ensembles (FFE), carrying stretchers, setting up wood and steel shoring, using dewatering equipment and handling active fire hoses.

“I love hands on experiences, it helps me learn better,” said Ship’s Serviceman Seaman Andrew Whitehurst, from Miami. “The fact that we get to touch everything and learn all the parts is pretty cool.”

As the end of PIA draws closer, John C. Stennis Sailors will need to shift their focus from maintenance to operations, and the need for damage control training will become more prominent.

“We’re about to start workups again so it’s important to have the crew train because we’re going to have to certify again in [damage control],” said Damage Control Fireman Chandler Lawson, from Greenville, South Carolina. “We do these rodeos so everyone can get a basis of training on all of the different kind of casualties we might have to fight.”
John C. Stennis is conducting a PIA at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Mike Pernick

BREMERTON, Washington – Sailors from USS John C. Stennis’ (CVN 74) Combined Multi-Cultural Heritage Committee held a festival celebrating Caribbean culture at the Bremerton Liberty Center at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in honor of Caribbean American Heritage Month, July 14.

The festival featured music, decorations representing different Caribbean Islands and lunch, including popular Caribbean dishes such as curried chicken, jerk chicken, plantains, and peas and rice.

Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Destiny Berthoud, from Atlanta, Georgia, president of the Stennis Multi-Cultural Heritage Committee, said it’s important to have events like this because it gives Sailors an opportunity to learn about the diversity of their shipmates.

“We represent many different islands including Jamaica, Cuba and Puerto Rico and we need to recognize all of them,” said Berthoud. “It’s summer, it’s a great day and that’s representative of the Caribbean. We’re very family oriented and love to have fun so that’s what we’re going to do here today.”

President George W. Bush signed a proclamation making June the official Caribbean American Heritage Month, June 5, 2006, dedicating the month to honoring the Caribbean Americans that have played an important part of the nation’s history.

The Combined Multi-Cultural Heritage Committee plans on hosting similar events on a monthly basis.

John C. Stennis is conducting a planned incremental availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Ikenna Tanaka

BREMERTON, Washington – The U.S. Pacific Fleet Chief Petty Officer Training Team (FCPOTT) held leadership training for chief petty officers and first class petty officers assigned to USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) at the Naval Operations Support Center (NOSC) Kitsap Auditorium at Naval Base Kitsap Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, July 10 – 13.

The training is designed to provide Sailors with the tools needed to develop and strengthen effective leadership.

“This is considered a high-velocity leadership training,” said Command Master Chief Jasen Williams, one of the FCPOTT trainers leading the training, from Birmingham, Alabama. “A lot is covered in the six-to-eight hours that we have with the chiefs and first classes such as ethics, fundamentals, Sailorization and how to train the next generation.”

Some of the attendees were receiving FCPOTT for the first time, while for others, it was more of a review.

“This course is kind of like a refresher,” said Williams. “It’s recommended that chiefs and first classes get this training about every 18 months even though they have the tools in their tool box already. Sometimes you have to re-sharpen those tools.”

FCPOTT regularly receives positive feedback from the Sailors that attend, according to Williams, and promotes an energized environment filled with participation.

“The master chiefs selected have great personalities and are out-going,” said Information System Technician 1st Class Tyreeh Bailey, the leading petty officer in the automated data processing division of John C. Stennis’ combat systems department, from Colorado Springs, Colorado. “They’re training the Sailors as if they’re having a conversation and encouraging participation. [The training has] given me good tools to move forward, and try to improve and correct some of what I see and have the power to change.”

For more information on the FCPOTT visit http://www.facebook.com/fcpott.

To schedule training, email usff_fltcpotra@navy.mil; use “[CMD] SCHEDULE REQUEST” in the subject line.
John C. Stennis is conducting a planned incremental availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Machinist’s Mate 2nd Class Eugene Rose

BREMERTON, Washington – Sailors aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) are attending ‘Full Speed Ahead,’ a new Navy training course which encourages positive decision making and highlights mid-level leadership.

‘Full Speed Ahead’ was announced by Vice Adm. Robert Burke, chief of naval personnel, Jan. 30, and reinforces the value of integrity, accountability, initiative and toughness to combat destructive behaviors and build professional resiliency.

The new training continues efforts in previous trainings, such as ‘Bystander Intervention’ and ‘Chart the Course,’ but in its own way.

“It’s more entertaining,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) 1st Class Dennis Archer, a command facilitator for ‘Full Speed Ahead,’ from Coral Springs, Florida. “There are a lot of videos in this training and it’s more interactive. You kind of get attached to the characters in the videos and I think that everyone likes it.”

Archer and other command facilitators are delivering the Full Speed Ahead training to all hands. Facilitators were selected to reflect the influence that they exhibit up and down the chain of command.

“We all went to training to be facilitators for this,” said Archer. “We had to … believe that we can make a difference in our culture. Change starts with us and we’d like to pass that on to our Sailors who are attending our trainings.”

Facilitators were trained and certified by Naval Education and Training Command’s (NETC) Master Mobile Training Teams (MMTT) to ensure quality training for Sailors.

Following their training, facilitators lead sessions incorporating the new, more interactive training techniques, such as interactive video and facilitated face-to-face sessions with small, mixed-paygrade groups.

Training is more effective and engaging, according to Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Benjamin Lindsay, from Safford, Arizona, because of the high level of interaction between instructors and Sailors.

“We encourage everyone to participate,” said Archer. “The more you participate the more enjoyable that the training will be and the more you’ll get from it because you get to engage with Sailors from different ranks, different backgrounds and see their side of it; how they’d handle different situations.”

Full Speed Ahead is already making an impact on John C. Stennis Sailors.

“I’ll keep in mind what was said and the different decisions that were made in the training,” said Electronics Technician 3rd Class Brandon Oakes, from Sacramento, California. “I’ll definitely follow that through with how I go about my career.”

John C. Stennis is conducting a planned incremental availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Ikenna Tanaka

BREMERTON, Washington – Thirty-three Sailors assigned to USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) were recognized for their promotion through the Meritorious Advancement Program (MAP) during an all-hands call, July 5.

MAP allows commanding officers an opportunity to recognize and advance top-performing Sailors in the pay grades E3-E5 to the next higher pay grade.

The program evaluates Sailors based on their overall performance, including community relations, advanced education, collateral duties and command involvement.

“MAP is not only important to the Stennis, but to the Navy,” said Lt. j.g. Gabriel Sanchez, John C. Stennis’ educational services officer, from Ruskin, Florida. “It empowers commands [with] the opportunity to advance motivated Sailors that stand out and have proven to be ready for the next level.”

Four Sailors were promoted to petty officer first class, 10 to petty officer second class and 19 to petty officer third class. Captain Greg Huffman, John C. Stennis’ commanding officer, congratulated and shook hands with each promoted Sailor.

“This means a lot because I’ve been a [petty officer] second class since 2008,” said Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class Timothy Dudley, from Mount Clemens, Michigan. “It feels great that my hard work is being recognized. I spent long hours on deployment working and made sure that I took care of my Sailors working for me so that my leadership would show.”

The Sailors who were promoted to petty officer first class are Ship’s Serviceman 1st Class Michaelangelo Burdios, Yeoman 1st Class Demetrius Souza, Master-at-Arms 1st Class Shawn Woodford and Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class Timothy Dudley.

The Sailors who were promoted to petty officer second class are Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Kenneth Patrick, Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Destiny Berthoud, Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) 2nd Class Akayla Blackwin, Electronics Technician 2nd Class Satanou Na, Ship’s Serviceman 2nd Class Alexis Valleroldan, Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Jordan Crow, Quartermaster 2nd Class Bradley Price, Ship’s Serviceman 2nd Class Robert Perkins, Ship’s Serviceman 2nd Class Christopher Perrine and Interior Communications Electrician 2nd Class Elizabeth Norman.

The Sailors who were promoted to petty officer third class are Personnel Specialist 3rd Class Shannon Torrance, Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Jasilyn Quinones, Ship’s Serviceman 3rd Class James Morra, Ship’s Serviceman 3rd Class Ayana Baker, Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Susan Serrrano, Aviation Maintenance Administrationman 3rd Class Taylor Johnson, Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Fuels) 3rd Class Christopher Tierce, Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Tre Kubota, Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Derionta Stephens, Damage Controlman 3rd Class Margaret Simko, Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Bianca Knight, Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) 3rd Class Latrice Rose, Electrician’s Mate 3rd Class Leander Tom, Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Nathan Carrillo, Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Edith Rhodes, Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Christopher Settle, Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Alexa Browder, Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Wilisoni Vasukilakeba and Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Jessica Aranda.

John C. Stennis is conducting a planned incremental availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.
For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://navy.mil/local/cvn74/ or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dakota Rayburn

BREMERTON, Washington – Thirteen Sailors assigned to USS John C. Stennis’ (CVN 74) volunteered their time at the Bremerton Backpack Brigade, helping sort and deliver food to local schools, June 16.
Every Friday during the school year, the Bremerton Backpack Brigade provides backpacks and bags of food to children in need within the Bremerton School District along with information about local food programs throughout the summer.

Myra Battin, board president of Bremerton Backpack Brigade, said that improved education will help the children better their circumstances and provide them with a better future, and proper nutrition is an important aspect of that goal.

“Children are not responsible for their circumstances … but they remain hungry nonetheless,” said Battin. “We believe that feeding those little tummies, keeping them well-nourished over the weekends in particular, allows them to arrive at school Monday morning ready to learn.”

The volunteers recognized the value of helping out their local community and how they might learn new ways to assist those in need.

“It’s a learning experience … to see what people do differently than what you do so when you go back to your place you can use that for yourself,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) 2nd Class Yaovi Ameto, from Togo, West Africa. He added that he hopes he inspires others to volunteer their time.

Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) Airman Janesha Johnson, from Brooklyn, said she has a significant amount of experience volunteering within her community before she joined the Navy. Her experiences taught her to understand other people and find common ground.

“If you get to know other people it make us more of a connected family,” said Johnson. “We all are dealing with the same [problems] together.”

Volunteering for worthy causes can become a healthy habit and all it takes is one time to get the bug.

“Just try it one time and see how much its helping and how much it’s appreciated and it will make you want to do it more,” said Information Specialist 3rd class Thalia Barry, from Fernwood, California. Barry said she was happy to volunteer her time to help people in need and believes other Sailors will feel just as rewarded as she did.

John C. Stennis is conducting a planned incremental availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, during which the ship is undergoing scheduled maintenance and upgrades.

For more news on John C. Stennis, visit http://www.stennis.navy.mil or follow along on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stennis74.

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